Newsletters Achive 2014-2016

June 2016

MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

  • Issue:
    Issue no.
    29
  • Date:
    June
    2016

 

Projecting a Happy Retirement

A 2015 study found that 41% of households headed by someone aged 55 to 64 had no retirement savings, and only about a third of them had a traditional pension. Among households in this age group with savings, the median amount was just $104,000.1

Your own savings may be more substantial, but in general Americans struggle to meet their savings goals. Even a healthy savings account may not provide as much income as you would like over a long retirement.

Despite the challenges, about 56% of current retirees say they are very satisfied with retirement, and 34% say they are moderately satisfied. Only 9% are dissatisfied.2

Develop a realistic picture

How can you transition into a happy retirement even if your savings fall short of your goals? The answer may lie in developing a realistic picture of what your retirement will look like, based on your expected resources and expenses. As a starting point, create a simple retirement planning worksheet. You might add details once you get the basics down on paper.

Estimate income and expenses

You can estimate your monthly Social Security benefit at ssa.gov. The longer you wait to claim your benefits, from age 62 up to age 70, the higher your monthly benefit will be. If you expect a pension, estimate that monthly amount as well. Add other sources of income, such as a part-time job, if that is in your plans. Be realistic. Part-time work often pays low wages.

It's more difficult to estimate the amount of income you can expect from your savings; this may depend on unpredictable market returns and the length of time you need your savings to last. One simple rule of thumb is to withdraw 4% of your savings each year. At that rate, the $104,000 median savings described earlier would generate $4,160 per year or $347 per month (assuming no market gains or losses). Keep in mind that some experts believe a 4% withdrawal rate may be too high to maintain funds over a long retirement. You might use 3% or 3.5% in your calculations.

Now estimate your monthly expenses. If you've paid off your mortgage and other debt, you may be in a stronger position. Don't forget to factor in a reserve for medical expenses. One study suggests that a 65-year-old couple who retired in 2015 would need $259,000 over their lifetimes to cover Medicare premiums and out-of-pocket health-care expenses, assuming they had only median drug expenses.3

Take strategic steps

Your projected income and expenses should provide a rough picture of your financial situation in retirement. If retirement is approaching soon, try living for six months or more on your anticipated income to determine whether it is realistic. If it's not, or your anticipated expenses exceed your income even without a trial run, you may have to reduce expenses or work longer, or both.

Even if the numbers look good, it would be wise to keep building your savings. You might take advantage of catch-up contributions to IRAs and 401(k) plans, which are available to those who reach age 50 or older by the end of the calendar year. In 2016, the IRA catch-up amount is $1,000, for a total contribution limit of $6,500. The 401(k) catch-up amount is $6,000, for a total employee contribution limit of $24,000.

Preparing for retirement is not easy, but if you enter your new life phase with eyes wide open, you're more likely to enjoy a long and happy retirement.

1U.S. Government Accountability Office, "Retirement Security," May 2015

2 The Wall Street Journal, "Why Retirees Are Happier Than You May Think," December 1, 2015

3Employee Benefit Research Institute, Notes, October 2015


 

Four Reasons Why People Spend Too Much

 

You understand the basic financial concepts of budgeting, saving, and monitoring your money. But this doesn't necessarily mean that you're in control of your spending. The following reasons might help explain why you sometimes break your budget.

1. Failing to think about the future

It can be difficult to adequately predict future expenses, but thinking about the future is a key component of financial responsibility. If you have a tendency to focus on the "here and now" without taking the future into account, then you might find that this leads you to overspend.

Maybe you feel that you're acting responsibly simply because you've started an emergency savings account. You might feel that it will help you cover future expenses, but in reality it may create a false sense of security that leads you to spend more than you can afford at a given moment in time.

Remember that the purpose of your emergency savings account is to be a safety net in times of financial crisis. If you're constantly tapping it for unnecessary purchases, you aren't using it correctly.

Change this behavior by keeping the big picture in perspective. Create room in your budget that allows you to spend discretionary money and use your emergency savings only for true emergencies. By having a carefully thought-out plan in place, you'll be less likely to overspend without realizing it.

2. Rewarding yourself

Are you a savvy shopper who rarely splurges, or do you spend too frequently because you want to reward yourself? If you fall in the latter category, your sense of willpower may be to blame. People who see willpower as a limited resource often trick themselves into thinking that they deserve a reward when they are able to demonstrate a degree of willpower. As a result, they may develop the unhealthy habit of overspending on random, unnecessary purchases in order to fulfill the desire for a reward.

This doesn't mean that you're never allowed to reward yourself--you just might need to think of other ways that won't lead to spending too much money. Develop healthier habits by rewarding yourself in ways that don't cost money, such as spending time outdoors, reading, or meditating. Both your body and your wallet will thank you.


If you do decide to splurge on a reward from time to time, do yourself a favor and plan your purchase. Figure out how much it will cost ahead of time so you can save accordingly instead of tapping your savings. Make sure that your reward, whether it's small or big, has a purpose and is meaningful to you. Try scaling back. For example, instead of dining out every weekend, limit this expense to once or twice a month. Chances are that you'll enjoy going out more than you did before, and you'll feel good about the money you save from dining out less frequently.

3. Mixing mood with money

Your emotional state can be an integral part of your ability to make sensible financial decisions. When you're unhappy, you might not be thinking clearly, and saving is probably not your first priority. Boredom or stress also makes it easy to overspend because shopping serves as a fast and easy distraction from your feelings. This narrow focus on short-term happiness might be a reason why you're spending more than normal.

Waiting to spend when you're happy and thinking more positively could help shift your focus back to your long-term financial goals. Avoid temptations and stay clear of stores if you feel that you'll spend needlessly after having an emotionally challenging day. Staying on track financially (and emotionally) will benefit you in the long run.

4. Getting caught up in home equity habits

Do you tend to spend more money when the value of your assets--particularly your property--increases? You might think that appreciating assets add to your spending power, thus making you feel both wealthier and more financially secure. You may be tempted to tap into your home equity, but make sure you're using it wisely.

Instead of thinking of your home as a piggy bank, remember it's where you live. Be smart with your home equity loan or line of credit--don't borrow more than what is absolutely necessary. For example, you may need to borrow to pay for emergency home repairs or health expenses, but you want to avoid borrowing to pay for gratuitous luxuries that could put you and your family's financial security at risk. After all, the lender could foreclose if you fail to repay the debt, and there may be closing costs and other charges associated with the loan.


Debt Optimization Strategies

 

As part of improving your financial situation, you might consider reducing your debt load. A number of strategies can be used to pay off debt. However, before starting any debt payoff strategy (or combination of strategies), be sure you understand the terms of your debts, including interest rates, terms of payment, and any prepayment or other penalties.

Understand minimum payments (a starting point)

You are generally required to make minimum payments on your debts, based on factors set by the lender. Failure to make the minimum payments can result in penalties, increased interest rates, and default. If you make only the minimum payments, it may take a long time to pay off the debt, and you may have to pay large amounts of interest over the life of the loan. This is especially true of credit card debt.

Your credit card statement will indicate the amount of your current monthly minimum payment. To find the factors used in calculating the minimum payment amount each month, you need to review terms in your credit card contract. These terms can change over time.

For credit cards, the minimum payment is usually equal to the greater of a minimum percentage multiplied by the card's balance (plus interest on the balance, in some cases) or a base minimum amount (such as $15). For example, assume you have a credit card with a current balance of $2,000, an interest rate of 18%, a minimum percentage of 2% plus interest, and a base minimum amount of $15. The initial minimum payment required would be $70 [greater of ($2,000 x 2%) + ($2,000 x (18% / 12)) or $15]. If you made only the minimum payments (as recalculated each month), it would take you 114 months (almost 10 years) to pay off the debt, and you would pay total interest of $1,314.

For other types of loans, the minimum payment is generally the same as the regular monthly payment.

Make additional payments

Making payments in addition to your regular or minimum payments can reduce the time it takes to pay off your debt and the total interest paid. The additional payments could be made periodically, such as monthly, quarterly, or annually.

For example, if you made monthly payments of $100 on the credit card debt in the previous example (the initial minimum payment was $70), it would take you only 24 months to pay


off the debt, and you would pay total interest of just $396.

As another example, let's assume you have a current mortgage balance of $100,000. The interest rate is 5%, the monthly payment is $791, and you have a remaining term of 15 years. If you make regular payments, you will pay total interest of $42,343. However, if you pay an additional $200 each month, it will take you only 11 years to pay off the debt, and you will pay total interest of just $30,022.

Another strategy is to pay one-half of your regular monthly mortgage payment every two weeks. By the end of the year, you will have made 26 payments of one-half the monthly amount, or essentially 13 monthly payments. In other words, you will have made an extra monthly payment for the year. As a result, you will reduce the time payments must be made and the total interest paid.

Pay off highest interest rate debts first

One way to potentially optimize payment of your debt is to first make the minimum payments required for each debt, and then allocate any remaining dollars to the debts with the highest interest rates.

For example, let's assume you have two debts, you owe $10,000 on each, and each has a monthly payment of $200. The interest rate for one debt is 8%; the interest rate for the other is 18%. If you make regular payments, it will take 94 months until both debts are paid off, and you will pay total interest of $10,827. However, if you make monthly payments of $600, with the extra $200 paying off the debt with an 18% interest rate first, it will take only 41 months to pay off the debts, and you will pay total interest of just $4,457.

Use a debt consolidation loan

If you have multiple debts with high interest rates, it may be possible to pay off those debts with a debt consolidation loan. Typically, this will be a home equity loan with a much lower interest rate than the rates on the debts being consolidated. Furthermore, if you itemize deductions, interest paid on home equity debt of up to $100,000 is generally deductible for income tax purposes, thus reducing the effective interest rate on the debt consolidation loan even further. However, a home equity loan potentially puts your home at risk because it serves as collateral, and the lender could foreclose if you fail to repay. There also may be closing costs and other charges associated with the loan.


Can I make charitable contributions from my IRA in 2016?

 

Yes, if you qualify. The law authorizing qualified charitable distributions, or QCDs, has recently been made permanent by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015.

You simply instruct your IRA trustee to make a distribution directly from your IRA (other than a SEP or SIMPLE) to a qualified charity. You must be 70½ or older, and the distribution must be one that would otherwise be taxable to you. You can exclude up to $100,000 of QCDs from your gross income in 2016. And if you file a joint return, your spouse (if 70½ or older) can exclude an additional $100,000 of QCDs. But you can't also deduct these QCDs as a charitable contribution on your federal income tax return--that would be double dipping.

QCDs count toward satisfying any required minimum distributions (RMDs) that you would otherwise have to take from your IRA in 2016, just as if you had received an actual distribution from the plan. However, distributions (including RMDs) that you actually receive from your IRA and subsequently transfer to a charity cannot qualify as QCDs.

For example, assume that your RMD for 2016 is $25,000. In June 2016, you make a $15,000 QCD to Qualified Charity A. You exclude the $15,000 QCD from your 2016 gross income. Your $15,000 QCD satisfies $15,000 of your $25,000 RMD. You'll need to withdraw another $10,000 (or make an additional QCD) by December 31, 2016, to avoid a penalty.

You could instead take a distribution from your IRA and then donate the proceeds to a charity yourself, but this would be a bit more cumbersome and possibly more expensive. You'd include the distribution in gross income and then take a corresponding income tax deduction for the charitable contribution. But the additional tax from the distribution may be more than the charitable deduction due to IRS limits. QCDs avoid all this by providing an exclusion from income for the amount paid directly from your IRA to the charity--you don't report the IRA distribution in your gross income, and you don't take a deduction for the QCD. The exclusion from gross income for QCDs also provides a tax-effective way for taxpayers who don't itemize deductions to make charitable contributions.


 

Can I name a charity as beneficiary of my IRA?

 

Yes, you can name a charity as beneficiary of your IRA, but be sure to understand the advantages and disadvantages.

Generally, a spouse, child, or other individual you designate as beneficiary of a traditional IRA must pay federal income tax on any distribution received from the IRA after your death. By contrast, if you name a charity as beneficiary, the charity will not have to pay any income tax on distributions from the IRA after your death (provided that the charity qualifies as a tax-exempt charitable organization under federal law), a significant tax advantage.

After your death, distributions of your assets to a charity generally qualify for an estate tax charitable deduction. In other words, if a charity is your sole IRA beneficiary, the full value of your IRA will be deducted from your taxable estate for purposes of determining the federal estate tax (if any) that may be due. This can also be a significant advantage if you expect the value of your taxable estate to be at or above the federal estate tax exclusion amount ($5,450,000 for 2016).


Of course, there are also nontax implications. If you name a charity as sole beneficiary of your IRA, your family members and other loved ones will obviously not receive any benefit from those IRA assets when you die . If you would like to leave some of your assets to your loved ones and some assets to charity, consider leaving your taxable retirement funds to charity and other assets to your loved ones. This may offer the most tax-efficient solution, because the charity will not have to pay any tax on the retirement funds.

If retirement funds are a major portion of your assets, another option to consider is a charitable remainder trust (CRT). A CRT can be structured to receive the funds free of income tax at your death, and then pay a (taxable) lifetime income to individuals of your choice. When those individuals die, the remaining trust assets pass to the charity. Finally, another option is to name the charity and one or more individuals as co-beneficiaries. (Note: There are fees and expenses associated with the creation of trusts.)

The legal and tax issues discussed here can be quite complex. Be sure to consult an estate planning attorney for further guidance.

 

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