Newsletters Achive 2014-2016

October 2015

MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

  • Issue:
    Issue no.
    21
  • Date:
    October
    2015

 

Six Common 401(k) Plan Misconceptions

Do you really know as much as you think you do about your 401(k) plan? Let's find out.

1. If I leave my job, my entire 401(k) account is mine to keep.

This may or may not be true, depending on your plan's "vesting schedule." Your own contributions to the plan--that is, your pretax or Roth contributions--are always yours to keep. While some plans provide that employer contributions are also fully vested (i.e., owned by you) immediately, other plans may require that you have up to six years of service before you're entitled to all of your employer contributions (or you've reached your plan's normal retirement age). Your 401(k)'s summary plan description will have details about your plan's vesting schedule.

2. Borrowing from my 401(k) plan is a bad idea because I pay income tax twice on the amount I borrow.

The argument is that you repay a 401(k) plan loan with dollars that have already been taxed, and you pay taxes on those dollars again when you receive a distribution from the plan. Though you might be repaying the loan with after-tax dollars, this would be true with any type of loan.

And while it's also true that the amount you borrow will be taxed when distributed from the plan (special rules apply to loans from Roth accounts), those amounts would be taxed regardless of whether you borrowed money from the plan or not. So the bottom line is that, economically, you're no worse off borrowing from your plan than you are borrowing from another source (plus, the interest you pay on a plan loan generally goes back into your account). But keep in mind that borrowing from your plan reduces your account balance, which may slow the growth of your retirement nest egg.

3. Because I make only Roth contributions to my 401(k) plan, my employer's matching contributions are also Roth contributions.

Employer 401(k) matching contributions are always pretax--whether they match your pretax or Roth contributions. That is, those matching contributions, and any associated earnings, will always be subject to income tax when you receive them from the plan. You can, however, convert your employer's matching contributions to Roth contributions if your plan allows. If you do, they'll be subject to income tax in the year of the conversion, but future qualified distributions of those amounts (and any earnings) will be tax free.

4. I contribute to my 401(k) plan at work, so I can't contribute to an IRA.

Your contributions to a 401(k) plan have no effect on your ability to contribute to a traditional or Roth IRA. However, your (or your spouse's) participation in a 401(k) plan may adversely impact your ability to deduct contributions to a traditional IRA, depending on your joint income.

5. I have two jobs, both with 401(k)s. I can defer up to $18,000 to each plan.

Unfortunately, this is not the case. You can defer a maximum of $18,000 in 2015, plus catch-up contributions if you're eligible, to all your employer plans (this includes 401(k)s, 403(b)s, SARSEPs, and SIMPLE plans). If you contribute to more than one plan, you're generally responsible for making sure you don't exceed these limits. Note that 457(b) plans are not included in this list. If you're lucky enough to participate in a 401(k) plan and a 457(b) plan you may be able to defer up to $36,000 (a maximum of $18,000 to each plan) in 2015, plus catch-up contributions.

6. I'm moving to a state with no income tax. I've heard my former state can still tax my 401(k) benefits when I retire.

While this was true many years ago, it's no longer the case. States are now prohibited from taxing 401(k) (and most other) retirement benefits paid to nonresidents. As a result, only the state in which you reside (or are domiciled) can tax those benefits. In general, your residence is the place where you actually live. Your domicile is your permanent legal residence; even if you don't currently live there, you have an intent to return and remain there.


 

2015 Year-End Tax Planning Basics

As the end of the 2015 tax year approaches, set aside some time to evaluate your situation and consider potential opportunities. Effective year-end planning depends on a good understanding of both your current circumstances and how those circumstances might change next year.

Basic strategies

Consider whether there's an opportunity to defer income to 2016. For example, you might be able to defer a year-end bonus or delay the collection of business debts, rents, and payments for services. When you defer income to 2016, you postpone payment of the tax on that income. And if there's a chance that you might be paying taxes at a lower rate next year (for example, if you know that you'll have less taxable income next year), deferring income might mean paying less tax on the deferred income.

You should also look for potential ways to accelerate 2016 deductions into the 2015 tax year. If you typically itemize deductions on Schedule A of Form 1040, you might be able to accelerate some deductible expenses--such as medical expenses, qualifying interest, or state and local taxes--by making payments before the end of the current year, instead of paying them in early 2016. Or you might consider making next year's charitable contribution this year instead. If you think you'll be itemizing deductions in one year but claiming the standard deduction in the other, trying to defer (or accelerate) Schedule A deductions into the year for which you'll be itemizing deductions might let you take advantage of deductions that would otherwise be lost.

Depending on your circumstances, you might also consider taking the opposite approach. For example, if you think that you'll be paying taxes at a higher rate next year (maybe as the result of a recent compensation increase or the planned sale of assets), you might want to look for ways to accelerate income into 2015 and possibly defer deductions until 2016 (when they could potentially be more valuable).

Complicating factors

First, you need to factor in the alternative minimum tax (AMT). The AMT is essentially a separate, parallel federal income tax system with its own rates and rules. If you're subject to the AMT, traditional year-end strategies may be ineffective or actually have negative consequences--that's because the AMT effectively disallows a number of itemized deductions. So if you're subject to the AMT in 2015, prepaying 2016 state and local taxes probably won't help your 2015 tax situation, and, in fact, could hurt your 2016 bottom line.

It's also important to recognize that personal and dependency exemptions may be phased out and itemized deductions may be limited once your adjusted gross income (AGI) reaches a certain level. This is especially important to factor in if your AGI is approaching the threshold limit and you're evaluating whether to accelerate or defer income or itemized deductions. For 2015, the AGI threshold is $258,250 if you file as single, $309,900 if married filing jointly, $154,950 if married filing separately, and $284,050 if head of household.

IRA and retirement plan contributions

Deductible contributions to a traditional IRA and pretax contributions to an employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k) could reduce your 2015 taxable income. (Note: A number of factors determine whether you're eligible to deduct contributions to a traditional IRA.) Contributions to a Roth IRA (assuming you meet the income requirements) or a Roth 401(k) plan are made with after-tax dollars--so there's no immediate tax savings--but qualified distributions are completely free of federal income tax.

For 2015, you're generally able to contribute up to $18,000 to a 401(k) plan ($24,000 if you're age 50 or older) and up to $5,500 to a traditional or Roth IRA ($6,500 if you're age 50 or older). The window to make 2015 contributions to an employer plan generally closes at the end of the year, while you typically have until the due date of your federal income tax return to make 2015 IRA contributions.

Important notes

The Supreme Court has legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, significantly simplifying the federal and state income tax filing requirements for same-sex married couples living in states that did not previously recognize their marriage.

A host of popular tax provisions (commonly referred to as "tax extenders") expired at the end of 2014. Although it is possible that some or all of these provisions will be retroactively extended, currently they are not available for the 2015 tax year. Among the provisions: deducting state and local sales taxes in lieu of state and local income taxes; the above-the-line deduction for qualified higher-education expenses; qualified charitable distributions (QCDs) from IRAs; and increased business expense and "bonus" depreciation rules.

 


Frequently Asked Questions on Opening a 529 Plan Account

529 plans are savings vehicles tailor-made for college. Anyone can open an account, lifetime contribution limits are typically over $300,000, and 529 plans offer federal and sometimes state tax benefits if certain conditions are met. Here are some common questions on opening an account.

Can I open an account in any state's 529 plan or am I limited to my own state's plan?

Answer: It depends on the type of 529 plan. There are two types of 529 plans: college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans. With a college savings plan, you open an individual investment account and direct your contributions to one or more of the plan's investment portfolios. With a prepaid tuition plan, you purchase education credits at today's prices and redeem them in the future for college tuition. Forty-nine states (all but Wyoming) offer one or more college savings plans, but only a few states offer prepaid tuition plans.

529 college savings plans are typically available to residents of any state, and funds can be used at any accredited college in the United States or abroad. But 529 prepaid tuition plans are typically limited to state residents and apply to in-state public colleges.

Why might you decide to open an account in another state's 529 college savings plan? The other plan might offer better investment options, lower management fees, a better investment track record, or better customer service. If you decide to go this route, keep in mind that some states may limit certain 529 plan tax benefits, such as a state income tax deduction for contributions, to residents who join the in-state plan.

Is there an age limit on who can be a beneficiary of a 529 account?

Answer: There is no beneficiary age limit specified in Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, but some states may impose one. You'll need to check the rules of each plan you're considering. Also, some states may require that the account be in place for a specified minimum length of time before funds can be withdrawn. This is important if you expect to make withdrawals quickly because the beneficiary is close to college age.

Can more than one 529 account be opened for the same child?

Answer: Yes. You (or anyone else) can open multiple 529 accounts for the same beneficiary, as long as you do so under different 529 plans (college savings plan or prepaid tuition plan). For example, you could open a college savings plan account with State A and State B for the same beneficiary, or you could open a college savings plan account and a prepaid tuition plan account with State A for the same beneficiary. But you can't open two college savings plan accounts in State A for the same beneficiary.

Also keep in mind that if you do open multiple 529 accounts for the same beneficiary, each plan has its own lifetime contribution limit, and contributions can't be made after the limit is reached. Some states consider the accounts in other states to determine whether the limit has been reached. For these states, the total balance of all plans (in all states) cannot exceed the maximum lifetime contribution limit.

Can I open a 529 account in anticipation of my future grandchild?

Answer: Technically, no, because the beneficiary must have a Social Security number. But you can do so in a roundabout way. First, you'll need to open an account and name as the beneficiary a family member who will be related to your future grandchild. Then when your grandchild is born, you (the account owner) can change the beneficiary to your grandchild. Check the details carefully of any plan you're considering because some plans may impose age restrictions on the beneficiary, such as being under age 21. This may pose a problem if you plan to name your adult son or daughter as the initial beneficiary.

What happens if I open a 529 plan in one state and then move to another state?

Answer: Essentially, nothing happens if you have a college savings plan. But most prepaid tuition plans require that either the account owner or the beneficiary be a resident of the state operating the plan. So if you move to another state, you may have to cash in the prepaid tuition plan.

If you have a college savings plan, you can simply leave the account open and keep contributing to it. Alternatively, you can switch 529 plans by rolling over the assets from that plan to a new 529 plan. You can keep the same beneficiary when you do the rollover (under IRS rules, you're allowed one 529 plan same-beneficiary rollover once every 12 months), but check the details of each plan for any potential restrictions. If you decide to stay with your original 529 plan, just remember that your new state might limit any potential 529 plan tax benefits to residents who participate in the in-state plan.

 

529 plan assets surpass $230 billion

Assets in 529 college savings plans reached $231.9 billion in the first quarter of 2015, a 10.1% increase over the first quarter of 2014. (Source: Strategic Insight, 2015)

Note: Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses associated with 529 plans before investing. More information about 529 plans is available in each issuer's official statement, which should be read carefully before investing. Also consider whether your state offers a 529 plan that provides residents with favorable state tax benefits. As with other investments, there are generally fees and expenses associated with participation in a 529 savings plan. There is also the risk that the investments may lose money or not perform well enough to cover college costs as anticipated.


 

My employer now offers wellness benefits as part of its employee benefits package. But what are they?

It's no surprise that your company has started offering wellness benefits, since many employers are already offering these types of programs as part of an overall employee benefits package. According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), in 2015, 80% of organizations provided wellness resources and information, and 70% of organizations offered some type of wellness program to their employees. (Source: 2015 Employee Benefits, Society for Human Resource Management, 2015)

When it comes to running a business, wellness benefits are definitely a win-win for most employers. Not only do they potentially reduce health-care costs by promoting healthier living, but they may also boost employee productivity and morale. The types of wellness programs vary among employers, but they typically cover a variety of healthy living issues, such as:

  • Smoking cessation
  • Exercise/physical fitness
  • Weight loss
  • Nutritional education
  • Health screenings

More recent additions to the wellness benefits arena include fitness/activity tracking, credit for registering and participating in marathons/races, and company-sponsored seasonal weight-loss challenges.

For employees, wellness benefits not only can help them adopt and live a healthier lifestyle, but can also provide them with financial benefits. Currently, employers that offer wellness programs are allowed to offer incentives to employees of up to 30% of the cost of their health-care premium (up to 50% for smoking cessation). These incentives are usually in the form of premium discounts and/or cash rewards.

It's important to note that with certain types of wellness incentives, such as cash bonuses or gift certificates, the value of the reward may be treated as taxable wages. As a result, it may be subject to payroll taxes.  

 


 

How do I compare my health insurance options during open enrollment?

    The decisions you make during open enrollment season regarding health insurance are especially important, since you generally must stick with the options you choose until the next open enrollment season, unless you experience a "qualifying" event such as marriage or the birth of a child. As a result, you should take the time to carefully review the types of plans offered by your employer and consider all the costs associated with each plan.

With most health insurance plans, your employer will pay a portion of the premium and require you to pay the remainder through payroll deductions. When comparing different plans, keep in mind that even though a plan with a lower premium may seem like the most attractive option, it could have higher potential out-of-pocket costs.

You'll want to review the copayments, deductibles, and coinsurance associated with each plan. This is an important step because these costs can greatly affect what you end up paying out-of-pocket. When reviewing the costs of each plan, consider the following:

  • Does the plan have an individual or family deductible? If so, what is the amount that will have to be satisfied before your insurance coverage kicks in?
  • Are there copayments? If so what amounts are charged for doctor visits, specialists, hospital visits, and prescription drugs?
  • Will you have to pay any coinsurance once you've satisfied the deductible?

You should also assess each plan's coverage and specific features. For example, are there coverage exclusions or limitations that apply? Which expenses are fully or partially covered? Do you have the option to go to doctors who are outside your plan's provider network? Does the plan offer additional types of coverage for vision, dental, or prescription drugs?

In the end, when reviewing your options, you'll want to balance the coverage and features offered under each plan against the plan's overall cost to determine which plan offers you the best value for your money

 

 

 

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