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mailNewsletter 53 | July 2017 | Archives | Services

 

 

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Dates to Remember in August

August 15th - Relaxation Day, a day to kick back and do nothing. Ahhhh! What a great day.  The stresses, the hustle and bustle seemingly consumes us, every day of the year. Even Sundays are no longer days of rest and relaxation. There never seems to be a day to just kick back and relax.  For those us with a hectic lifestyle, Relaxation Day is a day to look forward to. It provides a break from the madness of your busy work and personal schedule. Todays is the day to enjoy either doing absolutely nothing, or partaking in your favorite relaxation activity.

August 21st - National Senior Citizens Day, honor our elderly population.  On this day, we are encouraged to recognize and show appreciation for the value and contribution of elderly people to home, family and society.  On National Senior Citizens Day, we should: Spend some time with senior citizens, show our appreciation for senior citizens and/or do volunteer work in support of the elderly.  If you are a senior citizen, enjoy your day any way you desire. After all, this is your day! Make sure to take advantage of senior citizens specials and discounts. There's bound to be plenty offers today.

August 26th - National Dog Day, to honor dogs, and to rescue dogs from homelessness and abuse. It's an opportunity for us to recognize and appreciate the value and importance of dogs in our lives.  This day is intended to honor dogs for all that they do for us. In addition to giving love and companionship, dogs help us out in countless ways. They are watchdogs for our safety. They lead the blind. Dogs aid in search and rescue, and they seek out bombs and drugs.  The second goal of National Dog Day is to rescue dogs in need. On occasion, dogs need us to save them from homelessness and abuse. The goal of the National Dog Day foundation is to rescue 10,000 dogs a year. Lend a hand to help a dog in need today, or any day.
 

 

 

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·         Is Feeling Younger the Secret to a Longer Life?

Is Feeling Younger the Secret to a
Longer Life?

“You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.”

~George Bernard Shaw

While some people accept getting older as a natural part of life, many others are on a mission to fight the aging process and maintain a youthful attitude and appearance. Although we are often reminded to “age gracefully” – to accept our older selves just as they are – research shows those who stay young at heart may just be on to something.

If you’ve ever experienced the feeling that the image in the mirror doesn’t quite match up with how you feel on the inside, you’re not alone. In 2015, the Journal of the American Medical Association published the results of research conducted over an eight-year timespan.  The initial survey of about 6,500 people ages 52 and older revealed that almost 70 percent of respondents felt three or more years younger than their actual age.1

Eight years later, researchers went back and resurveyed the participants. They found 86 percent of the people who reported feeling younger than their actual age were still alive, as compared to 82 percent of the people who felt their actual age and 75 percent who felt older.2

What’s the lesson here? This study and a variety of others point to the idea that feeling young actually helps us live longer. It’s the idea to stay “psychologically young”: maintaining a positive outlook, staying active physically and mentally, and enjoying a life of quality even into our older years.3 But how can we feel younger? Here are four tips:

    1. Eat right. Maintain a healthy diet, including plenty of veggies, fruits and protein. Also, make sure you’re getting plenty of omega-3 fatty acids, found in salmon, nuts and seeds. These help prevent inflammation in your body, which affects you both mentally and physically.4
    1. Get some exercise – physical and mental. Feeling younger means moving more. You need to challenge not only your body, but also your brain. The Alzheimer’s Association suggests things like taking a college course, finishing a daily crossword and enjoying an occasional play or performance as ways to stay mentally active.5
    1. Set goals for the future. Goals give us something to work toward and look forward to, no matter your age. Your goals can be related to health, family, career, travel or anything that sounds interesting to you!
    1. Look on the bright side. A positive attitude can help you live longer. For example, a Harvard study of 70,000 female nurses found the most optimistic quarter of respondents had a 31 percent reduced risk of mortality.6 Sometimes keeping a positive outlook on life can keep you going, even when there may be negative external circumstances.

While it pays to think positive and keep a youthful mindset, lifespans of all people in general have gotten longer over the years. If you’re fortunate enough to live many years after retirement, you’re going to need a well-thought-out financial strategy. Using a variety of insurance and investment products, we can help you create a strategy that helps you to live the kind of retirement you’ve worked hard for. Contact us today to get started on your financial strategy for a long life.

Content prepared by Amy Ragland.

1 Isla Rippon, MSc and Andrew Steptoe, DSc. American Medical Association.  February 2015. “Feeling Old vs. Being Old: Associations Between Self-Perceived Age and Mortality.”  http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2020288. Accessed June 8, 2017.

2 Heidi Godman. Harvard Health Publications. Aug. 5, 2016. “Feeling Young at Heart May Help You Live Longer.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/feeling-young-heart-may-help-live-longer-201412177598. Accessed June 7, 2017.

3 Ibid.

4 Marisa Fox. Fitness Magazine. “10 All-Natural Ways to Stay Young.” http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/mind-body/feeling/10-all-natural-ways-to-stay-young/. Accessed June 7, 2017.

5 Alzheimer’s Association. “Stay Mentally Active.” http://www.alz.org/we_can_help_stay_mentally_active.asp. Accessed June 8, 2017.

6 Deborah Netburn. Los Angeles Times. Dec. 9, 2016. http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-optimists-longer-life-20161208-story.html. Accessed June 8, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.


·         3 Common Questions About Social Security

3 Common Questions About Social
Security

While Social Security shouldn’t be relied upon to be the sole source of income during retirement, it can play an important role in your overall financial strategy for retirement. But making sense of the basic ins and outs of Social Security can be overwhelming. Here are three questions people commonly ask as they approach retirement age:

When can I start taking benefits?

While full retirement age is 66 for people born between 1943 and 1954 and gradually increases to age 67 for those born in 1960 or later, you can start receiving Social Security benefits at age 62.1 Keep in mind, however, that there is a cost to early distribution; your benefits are reduced by about 0.5 percent for each month you receive benefits before full retirement age.2 For example, those born in 1955 with a full retirement age of 66 and two months who start taking benefits at age 62 will receive about 75 percent of the full benefit.3

On the flip side, delaying benefits past full retirement age, up to age 70, increases your distribution amount. If the same individual in the previous example waits until age 68 to take benefits, his or her benefit will increase 8 percent each year after full retirement age. This increase continues until you reach age 70 or you start taking benefits, whichever comes first.4

What happens to my benefits when I die?

It depends. If you are married and your spouse is age 60 or older, he or she may be eligible to collect a survivor’s benefit. The benefit amount remains the same as the deceased’s amount, although that amount is reduced if benefits are started before the surviving spouse’s full retirement age.5 A spouse cannot collect both survivors benefits and retirement benefits based on their own work record. They will collect whichever benefit is higher.6

If you have a minor child or children, your surviving spouse (regardless of age) may also be eligible for a survivors benefit until the minor child turns age 16. If you have no surviving spouse or minor children, your benefit remains in the Social Security trust fund and is not paid out to any other named beneficiaries, unless they qualify under the Social Security survivors benefits eligibility rules.7

 Can I work while receiving benefits?

Yes. However, if you haven’t reached full retirement age, your benefit amount will be reduced if your earnings exceed the limit. Starting with the month you’ve reached full retirement age, your benefits will not be reduced no matter how much you earn.8 The earnings limit and reduced amount vary according to your age. To find out how much your benefits might be reduced, use the Social Security earnings calculator at https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/RTeffect.html.9

Understanding Social Security can be challenging, but you don’t have to go it alone. Contact us today to learn more about  how to incorporate your Social Security benefits  into your complete financial strategy. We may be able to identify potential retirement income gaps and may introduce investment and insurance products as a potential solution.

 

Content prepared by Amy Ragland.

 1 Social Security. January 2017. “Understanding the Benefits.” https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10024.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Social Security. “Retirement Planner: Benefits By Year of Birth.” https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/agereduction.html. Accessed June 20, 2017.

4 Social Security. “Retirement Planner: Delayed Retirement Credits.” https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/delayret.html. Accessed June 20, 2017.

5 Joseph L. Matthews. Caring.com. Dec. 24, 2016. “What happens to the rest of a person’s Social Security money after they die?” https://www.caring.com/questions/social-security-benefits-after-death. Accessed June 20, 2017.

6 Ibid.

7 Ibid.

8 Social Security. June 15, 2017. “What happens if I work and get Social Security retirement benefits?” https://faq.ssa.gov/link/portal/34011/34019/Article/3739/What-happens-if-I-work-and-get-Social-Security-retirement-benefits. Accessed June 20, 2017.

9 Social Security. “Retirement Earnings Test Calculator.” https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/RTeffect.html. Accessed June 20, 2017.

 Financial professionals are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Social Security benefits. We are not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

 We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.


·         Tax-Deferred or Tax-Exempt? Potential Benefits to Having Both

Tax-Deferred or Tax-Exempt? Potential
Benefits to Having Both

Over the years, you may have heard it’s good to have different “kinds” of money as you head into retirement. A financial advisor may recommend a combination of tax-deferred and tax-exempt financial products, diversifying your money to help take advantage of the tax benefits both types of products provide.

What many people don’t understand, however, is why it’s important to take advantage of the different types of financial products available. What are the potential benefits of utilizing both tax-deferred and tax-exempt products? First, let’s take a look at the difference between the two.

A tax-deferred financial product means simply that: You owe taxes on the money, but those taxes have been deferred or pushed back. You haven’t paid any taxes on the contributions or the growth that’s occurred over the life of the product. When you take money out of it, those distributions are 100 percent taxable at ordinary income rates.1 Withdrawals taken prior to age 59 1/2 may also be subject to an additional 10 percent federal tax.

What types of financial products are tax-deferred? A 401(k), 403(b) or traditional IRA are all examples of tax-deferred investment products. Growth in some types of annuities or life insurance policies may also be tax-deferred.2

Tax-exempt means no taxes are owed on qualified distributions made from the financial product. A Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) is a good example of a tax-exempt account. Contributions to a Roth are made with money that’s already been taxed.3

So why can it be beneficial to have a mix of tax-deferred and tax-exempt financial products in your financial strategy? Mostly, it gives you flexibility in how you take distributions during your retirement. For example, you might use distributions from tax-deferred products to pay for your fixed expenses every month. If you have expenses that are outside of your “normal” spending -- such as a vacation or a large purchase -- you could use money from a tax-exempt product and not incur a taxable event.

While it could be tempting to go heavy in tax-exempt financial products when you’re establishing a financial strategy, using a tax-deferred product may put more money in your pocket in the long run. Many people are in a lower tax bracket during their retirement years. If that is the case, you may pay less taxes on distributions during retirement than if you were paying taxes on your contributions up front while still working.4

What’s the right mix of tax-deferred and tax-exempt financial products for you? Every situation is unique. If you’re not sure what types of financial products you should be using, give us a call. We can look at your existing financial strategy and make recommendations based on your specific circumstances. We can also help you determine if life insurance and annuities could play a part in your tax-efficient strategy. Our mission is to help you plan for the best retirement possible.

Content prepared by Amy Ragland

1 The Balance. “What is a Tax-Deferred Investment Account?” https://www.thebalance.com/tax-deferred-savings-account-and-investments-2388988. Accessed May 31, 2017.

2 Prudential. “Tax Strategies: Tax-Deferred Annuities.” http://www.prudential.com/view/page/public/12609?param=12624. Accessed June 1, 2017.

3 Teresa Mears. U.S. News & World Report. Dec. 19, 2014. “7 Retirement Savings Accounts You Should Consider.” http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2014/12/19/7-retirement-savings-accounts-you-should-consider. Accessed May 31, 2017.

4 Arthur Pinkasovitch. Investopedia. “Retirement Savings: Tax-Deferred or Tax-Exempt?” Updated April 5, 2017. http://www.investopedia.com/articles/taxes/11/tax-deferred-tax-exempt.asp. Accessed May 31, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.


·         Quote of the Month

Quote of the Month


 

 

 

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August Did you know pic

- Wild Bill Hickok, a noted figure of the American Old West, was killed in a saloon in Deadwood, South Dakota, on August 2, 1876.

- The Coast Guard branch of the military was founded on August 4, 1790.

- The America’s Cup is the most prestigious award in international yachting and was awarded for the first time on August 22, 1851.

- Motorized taxis’ began operating in New York City on August 13, 1907.


 

 

 

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